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Submissions, Contact Information, Style Guide

Gravesiana Submission Information

1. Gravesiana is published annually online as a peer-reviewed electronic journal (available free of charge on registration at http://www.robertgraves.org/gravesiana).

2. Articles should be word-processed, using MS Word if possible.

3. References should follow the MHRA system: see the Modern Humanities Research Association Style Guide: A Handbook for Authors, Editors, and Writers of Theses, second edition (2008), available for download free of charge as a PDF file at http://www.mhra.org.uk/Publications/Books/StyleGuide/download.shtml. First references to a book, article, or other publication should be given in full in an endnote. Endnotes should, however, be kept to a minimum, and as far as possible references should be incorporated into the text. Subsequent references should be given in the shortest easily identifiable form, preferably in parentheses within the text (see the MHRA Style Guide, 11). For other points, see also the Gravesiana Style Guide (Version 5), below.

4. Articles may include endnotes produced by MS Word′s automated utility for this. Otherwise text should be marked up as little as possible. For example, please do not number pages or create headers or footers. Where an article uses non-roman scripts or characters, please indicate where the necessary fonts can be found, free of copyright, or supply them with the article.

5. All items, including critical and biographical studies, reviews and news items, should preferably be sent as an e-mail attachment (please include an electronic copy on disc if sending by post) to:

Michael Joseph

e-mail: mjoseph@rutgers.edu

6. All contributors will receive access to the electronic edition of the journal.

Gravesiana Style Guide (Version 5)

References:

References should follow the MHRA system: see the Modern Humanities Research Association Style Guide: A Handbook for Authors, Editors, and Writers of Theses, second edition (2008), available for download free of charge as a PDF file.

First references to a book, article, or other publication should be given in full in an endnote. Endnotes should, however, be kept to a minimum, and as far as possible references should be incorporated into the text. Subsequent references should be given in the shortest easily identifiable form, preferably in parentheses within the text (see the MHRA Style Guide, 11.)

Quotations:

Use single quotation marks for short quotations (not more than about sixty words of prose or two complete lines of verse), double for a quotation within a quotation. A line division in a verse quotation is indicated by an oblique stroke (with a space on either side): ′Pain, that unpurposed, matchless elemental / Stronger than fear or grief, stranger than love.′

For a short quotation within a sentence, the final full stop should be outside the closing quotation mark. The final full stop should precede the closing quotation mark only when the quotation forms a complete sentence or sentences, and is not integrated within the introductory words but clearly separated from it. For example:

In the Foreword Graves asserts that he writes ′poems for poets, and satires and grotesques for wits′.

In the Foreword Graves asserts: ′I write poems for poets, and satires and grotesques for wits.′

Long quotations - more than about sixty words of prose or more than one paragraph, and more than two lines of verse - should be indented (without quotation marks) by 1 cm., and separated from the rest of the text by an extra space before and after the quotation.

Omissions within prose quotations should be indicated by an ellipsis within square brackets: [. . .], omitted lines of verse by an ellipsis within square brackets at the end of the line before the omission:

Professional standards in poetry [. . .] are founded upon the sense enjoyed by every English poet since the time of Chaucer, that he forms part of a long and honourable tradition.

 

So far from praising he blasphemes

Who says that God has been or is,

Who swears he met with God in dreams

Or face to face in woods and streams,

Meshed in their boundaries. [. . .]

 

The caterpillar years-to-come

March head to tail with years-that-were

Round and around the cosmic drum;

To time and space they add their sum,

But how is Godhead there?

 

It is not normally necessary to indicate an omission at the beginning or end of a quotation.

Possessives and apostrophes:

Graves′s poetry (not Graves′); the 1930s (not the 1930′s).

Spelling:

-ise rather than -ize. E.g. realise, recognise, etc. American spelling (honor, traveler, etc.) should be Anglicised (except in quotations).

Canellun, Deyá, Mallorca, Mallorcan (not Canelluñ/Ca n′Alluny, Deià, Majorca, Majorcan).

Abbreviations: 

No full stop when the last letter is the last letter of the word (vols but vol., eds but ed., Mr, Dr, Ltd), nor in acronyms (USA, BBC). Full stop otherwise (e.g., i.e., p.m., etc.).

Initials in people′s names should be followed by a full stop and a space (T. S. Eliot).

Dates:

24 July 1895 is the form to be used. Decades can be referred to as ′the thirties′ or ′the 1930s′, but not both. Years: 1945, not ′45. Centuries: spelled out, lower case (the twentieth century).

Numbers:

Numbers up one hundred, when part of a narrative and not in references or statistics, should be written as words. For inclusive numbers within the same hundred, the last two figures should be given, after a dash (not a hyphen): 12-15, 71-72, 365-66, 1939-45. Percentage should be written in numbers and words (50 per cent).

Italics:

Use italics for titles of all works individually published under their own titles - books, journals, plays, films, longer poems, pamphlets. Titles of chapters of books, articles in journals, poems or essays which form part of a larger volume or other whole, and the first line of poems used as titles, should be written in roman within single quotation marks, as should titles of unpublished books. Titles of other works included in an italicised title should be in italics within single quotation marks (e.g. The Question of ′Hamlet′).

Single words or short phrases in foreign languages should be in italics (e.g. Weltanschauung, mise en scène), except when part of regular English usage (e.g. cliché, leitmotif, milieu, status quo). Latin words and abbreviations commonly used should not be italicised (cf., e.g., etc., i.e., ibid., op. cit., passim); sic is an exception.

Paragraphs:

The first line of a paragraph should be indented by 0.25 cm., except at the beginning of an essay/article or section.

For further points, see the Modern Humanities Research Association Style Guide, and the ′Submission and Contact Information′ on the inside back cover of the latest issue of Gravesiana (available at www.robertgraves.org).

Michael Joseph (Editor)

March 2017

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